Michelle Obama discusses her memoir “Becoming” in YouTube special

Michelle Obama discusses her memoir “Becoming” in YouTube special

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ’21

In celebration of March’s Women’s History Month, Michelle Obama starred in the YouTube original special, “BookTube: A Discussion with Michelle Obama.” The series is divided into seven short videos in which Obama discusses her record-breaking memoir, “Becoming,” and answers questions from a panel of YouTube personalities.

“The Collected Schizophrenias” insightfully addresses mental illnesses

BY CAROLINE MAO ’22

In her autobiographical essay collection, “The Collected Schizophrenias,” Esme Weijun Wang discusses her personal experiences with a variety of mental and physical illnesses, particularly schizoaffective disorder. The collection begins with her journey towards diagnosis and includes topics such as her family’s history of mental illness and their refusal to acknowledge it, her expulsion from Yale as a result of her repeated psychiatric hospitalizations and her decision not to have children.

Margaret Atwood to write sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Margaret Atwood to write sequel to “The Handmaid’s Tale”

BY CAROLINE MAO ’22

In November 2018, Margaret Atwood announced that she would be releasing a sequel to her 1985 novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” in September 2019. The sequel, entitled “The Testaments,” has no connection to the Hulu television adaptation of “The Handmaid’s Tale.” It follows three female narrators from Gilead, a dystopian America, and is set 15 years after the first novel.

Increasing diversity in YA Lit raises questions about authorship

BY GABY RODRIGUEZ ’22

Young adult (YA) novels rocketed into the public eye in 2008 when Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” came to the big screen. YA has always been a genre that defied typical expectations; not quite children’s literature but not quite a full-fledged heavy adult narrative, YA is a rebellion against publishing norms. This boundary-pushing nature gives minority authors more opportunities to publish their work, creating a more diverse array of YA novels.

Feminist science fiction author Vonda McIntyre dies at 70

Feminist science fiction author Vonda McIntyre dies at 70

BY SIDNEY BOKER ’21

On April 1, award-winning author Vonda N. McIntyre died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 70. According to her obituary in the Guardian, McIntyre was at the forefront of science fiction in the 1970s, inspired by other feminist authors like Ursula K. Le Guin and Joanna Russ. McIntyre wrote about women in a genre in which women usually weren’t represented and explored gender in many of her works.

“One Hundred Years of Solitude” receives television adaptation

“One Hundred Years of Solitude” receives television adaptation

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ’21

Since its first publication in 1967, Gabriel García Márquez’s “One Hundred Years of Solitude” has been met with international acclaim. Despite its popularity, the novel has not been adapted into a film or TV show in the 50 years since its publication. Now, for the first time ever, the story will be told on screen.

Ahmed continues Mount Holyoke’s winning streak in poetry competition

Ahmed continues Mount Holyoke’s winning streak in poetry competition

BY SIDNEY BOKER ’21

A hush of anticipation fell over Gamble Auditorium as the first student-poet took the podium for the 96th annual Kathryn Irene Glascock Intercollegiate Poetry Competition. It honors Glascock, who died of pneumonia a few months after graduating from Mount Holyoke. Ahmed’s success marks the third consecutive year for a Mount Holyoke student to win the competition.

“The Book of Unknown Americans” reviewed by an unknown American

BY GABRIELLE RODRIGUEZ ’22

Mount Holyoke’s 2018 common read, “The Book of Unknown Americans” by Cristina Henríquez, is a novel full of complex and validating representations of immigrant communities. Literary systems must be critiqued to be bettered, and while Henríquez does a great job crafting an enticing story with great representation, I will continue to push for stories with Latinx casts that do not hinge on trauma.

Morgan Parker and Danez Smith discuss poetry and politics

Morgan Parker and Danez Smith discuss poetry and politics

BY CAROLINE MAO ’22

The sound of fingers snapping in appreciation echoed around Gamble Auditorium as poets Morgan Parker and Danez Smith read a selection of poems from their latest books on Thursday, Feb. 21. Both poets also spoke about a variety of personal experiences.

Sandra Cisneros wins PEN Award for “awe-inspiring body of work”

Sandra Cisneros wins PEN Award for “awe-inspiring body of work”

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ’21

Sandra Cisneros, an acclaimed Mexican-American novelist, has won the PEN/Nabokov Award for Achievement in International Literature. Cisneros is the third author to receive this award, following Adonis and Edna O’Brien in 2017 and 2018, respectively.

Women of color still missing, even as publishers strive for inclusivity

Women of color still missing, even as publishers strive for inclusivity

BY GABRIELLE RODRIGUEZ ’22

LGBTQ+ romance is notoriously hard to find. Romance involving LGBTQ+ women is even more scarce. Whether it be in the romance genre itself or in the growing ranks of LGBTQ+ mainstream novels, the question of which stories are told and how to tell them is one that arises with every new publication.

After decades of effort, Bellatrix library to be relocated to Abbey

BY CAROLINE MAO ’22

As Mount Holyoke College’s second oldest consistently-run student organization Bellatrix approaches its 50th anniversary, they are near the completion of a project they’ve hoped to see succeed for decades: the relocation of their library.

Top picks: Most anticipated books of early 2019

BY SIDNEY BOKER ’21

New year, new books! This list of books to look out for in 2019 was compiled from Literary Hub’s “Most Anticipated Books of 2019,” Goodreads’ “43 Highly Anticipated Books of 2019” and Entertainment Weekly’s “50 most anticipated books of 2019.” This year’s new books span genres including YA, thriller, contemporary, fantasy and essay collections. The books spotlighted here are a few of this year’s top picks curated to meet a range of literary interests at Mount Holyoke.

Wattpad’s publishing division creates accessible platform for writers

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ’21

On Jan. 24, online storytelling platform Wattpad announced that they will enter the print industry with their own publishing division, Wattpad Books. The website announced that, starting in the fall of 2019, Wattpad Books will publish six Young Adult (YA) titles, all stories that are popular on Wattpad.

“The Collector’s Apprentice”

BY KATE FLAHERTY ’19

Art, deception, love and murder are the centerpieces of B.A. Shapiro’s historical mystery novel, “The Collector’s Apprentice.” Shapiro, whose 2012 novel “The Art Forger” became a New York Times best-seller, delivers a lyrical and elegant story set in 1920s Paris and Philadelphia. Shapiro weaves in the lives of dozens of historical figures like Henri Matisse and Gertrude Stein, immersing the reader in a world of postImpressionist artists.

“Game of Thrones” author George R. R. Martin reveals his struggles with writing

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ’21

Since the release of George R. R. Martin’s “A Dance with Dragons” in 2011, fans have been impatiently awaiting the sixth book in Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire” series, “The Winds of Winter.” An ongoing joke with “A Song of Ice and Fire” fans is that winter is not coming soon enough.

MoHo students tackle NaNoWriMo

MoHo students tackle NaNoWriMo

BY DEANNA KALIAN ’20

“I have a history of dragging friends into questionable endeavors,” explained Chris Baty, the creator of National Novel Writing Month, otherwise known as NaNoWriMo. “And NaNoWriMo was one of many self-improvement schemes that began with me saying ‘What if we all got together and….’”

Empowering writers online: The rising influence of Wattpad

Empowering writers online: The rising influence of Wattpad

BY BEATA GARRETT ’20

This year, “The Kissing Booth,” a romantic comedy on Netflix, and the supernatural thriller “Light as a Feather” were released on Netflix and Hulu. Both films started as novels on Wattpad, a website and a community for the online publication of user-generated fiction, and were subsequently published by Penguin Random House and Simon Pulse, respectively.

“Little Women” to receive another film adaptation in 2019

“Little Women” to receive another film adaptation in 2019

BY SIDNEY BOKER ’21

“Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott is being adapted into a new film, set to be released in 2019. According to the New Yorker, Alcott wrote the book in 1868 after publisher Thomas Niles prompted her to write a “girls’ story.” Before “Little Women,” Alcott published thriller stories in different weekly papers under the pseudonym A.M. Barnard to help her financially-strapped family. The Alcott family consisted of Bronson, Alcott’s transcendentalist and jobless father, her mother Abba and her three sisters, who served as Alcott’s inspiration for the March sisters in “Little Women.”

Stephen Dillon promotes book

Stephen Dillon promotes book

BY ISABEL RODRIGUEZ ‘21

Stephen Dillon, an assistant professor of critical race and queer studies at Hampshire College, spoke to a packed crowd at Amherst Books last Friday night. His new book, “Fugitive Life: The Queer Politics of the Prison State,” focuses primarily on the work of underground women activists in the United States during the 1970s.