Has MGM lived up to its economic promise?

Has MGM lived up to its economic promise?

BY KILLIAN DOBROTH

An older man in a blue overcoat and a gray vest stood by a translucent slot machine, ordering a drink. His face was spotted with brown freckles and wrinkles and he wore a pair of roundish glasses. “There’s an old adage,” said the man, John Tranghese of Chicopee. “It goes like this: ‘any port in a storm will do. This casino is our Pioneer Valley port in a storm.”

Dis-O: Mount Holyoke, what’s happening to me?

Dis-O: Mount Holyoke, what’s happening to me?

Mount Holyoke College boasts a myriad of traditions that date back more than a century. One of these traditions, dating back to the early 1900s, aims to bring the senior and first-year classes together: DisOrientation or Dis-O, formerly known as Hazing Day or Freshman Day.

Mount Holyoke hosts Five College Philosophy Conference

Mount Holyoke hosts Five College Philosophy Conference

On Feb. 15 and 16, Mount Holyoke College hosted the annual Five College Philosophy Conference, sponsored by the philosophy department and the Philosophy Society. The first day consisted of a series of workshops geared towards philosophy students. On the second day, students presented their ideas on topics ranging from environmental ethics to just war theory.

New Living Learning Communities introduced

New Living Learning Communities introduced

BY SAACHI KHANDPUR ’22

Rachel Alldis announced in an email to the Mount Holyoke community on Feb. 5, 2019 that Residential Life is launching three new Living Learning Communities. These new additions contribute to a total of fourteen LLCs at Mount Holyoke, each based on a common interest or shared identity.

MoRomance: Dirty Dancing

MoRomance: Dirty Dancing

BY GRACE FITZGERALD ’20

For a fun and flirty MoRomance date, we set up sophomore Beatrice* and junior Lucia* on a date to eat tasty food and learn to dance salsa. The two met outside the Mandelles common room for a night of romance, and here’s how it went…

SGA Spotlight: Committee Yourself Week

SGA Spotlight: Committee Yourself Week

BY ANNAMARIE WIRE ’22, SAEE CHITALE ’22 AND SAM HERSH ’19

Student Government Association (SGA) Committees are student-run focus groups that work to solve problems to plan and to regulate systems that enable the smooth functioning of various aspects of the Mount Holyoke community. In honor of Committee Yourself Week, the Mount Holyoke News wanted to take the time to feature a few of the many committees that are now accepting new student members.

Mary Lyon’s vision prevails: Campus remains residential

Mary Lyon’s vision prevails: Campus remains residential

SAVANNAH HARRIMAN-POTE ’20

In an 1836 fundraising letter, Mary Lyon laid out her intention for an all-residential female seminary, one of the first of its kind. Though plenty has changed, Mount Holyoke still prides itself on being a residential community.

Discussions of diversity in philosophy spark curriculum changes

Discussions of diversity in philosophy spark curriculum changes

BY AVERY MARTIN ’22

Philosophy, as an academic field, tends to be extremely homogeneous. The majority of material covered in academic philosophy comes from a “canon” of western philosophers such as Plato, Socrates and Nietzsche.

Kijua Sanders-McMurtry: Mount Holyoke’s first chief diversity officer

Kijua Sanders-McMurtry: Mount Holyoke’s first chief diversity officer

BY ANNAMARIE WIRE ’22

Mount Holyoke’s first chief diversity officer Kijua Sanders-McMurtry began her work with diversity at an early age. Raised in Pasadena, California, her parents were activists who belonged to an organization that was in part responsible for the founding of Kwanzaa. “I really feel like my parents being in this very radical organization, [that was] honestly misogynistic in the way it treated women, made me really question and interrogate [...] differences, culture and diversity,” she said.

Students speak out with “Mount Holyoke Doesn’t Teach Me” photo project

Students speak out with “Mount Holyoke Doesn’t Teach Me” photo project

Mara Kleinberg ’22 holds a sign reading “Mount Holyoke doesn’t teach me any other music for vespers besides Christmas carols which violate my faith.”

Hunar Anand ’21 holds a sign reading “Mount Holyoke doesn’t teach me about my religion — Sikhism.”

Lynn Shen ’19 holds a sign reading “Mount Holyoke doesn’t teach me non-Euro-American centric environmental issues/actions/histories.”

Sophie Vincent ’22 holds a sign reading “Mount Holyoke doesn’t teach me the histories of acts of violence committed against ethnic minorities outside the U.S.A.”

BY GABRIELLE SHANG ’22

Representatives from six student organizations organized a photo campaign at Blanchard Community Center called “Mount Holyoke Doesn’t Teach Me” on Nov. 1. The goal of the campaign was to promote the representation of people of color — and many other marginalized identities — in liberal arts education. Students were provided a dry-erase board and a marker to respond to the prompt “Mount Holyoke Doesn’t Teach Me.”

Mount Holyoke hosts triennial Black Alumnae Conference

Mount Holyoke hosts triennial Black Alumnae Conference

BY ANNAMARIE WIRE ’22

Over the weekend, Black Mount Holyoke alumnae from across the country and around the world returned to campus to participate in the Alumnae Association’s 15th triennial Black Alumnae Conference. This conference was of special importance this year, as it coincided with the 50th anniversary of the Association for Pan-African Unity (APAU), formerly the Afro-American Society, and of the founding of the Betty Shabazz Cultural Center. It was also the first-ever Black Alumnae Conference live-streamed internationally to countries in Africa and the Caribbean, as well as in the U.S.

Students speak on the latest study craze

Students speak on the latest study craze

BY SAM MOULTON ’22

It’s no secret that midterms are a stressful time for college students. According to the American Psychological Association, 61 percent of all college students seeking mental health services on campuses do so in order to treat anxiety.

Title IX and you

BY SAEE CHITALE ’22

What is Title IX?

Title IX is a federal civil rights law passed as part of the Education Amendments of 1972 that states “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”

Chop, chop! Students on MoHo’s famous haircut

Chop, chop! Students on MoHo’s famous haircut

BY MADELINE FITZGERALD ’21

The snipping of scissors and a pile of hair on a dorm room floor — this is the start of a Mount Holyoke tradition. It’s not one listed on the College’s Wikipedia page, nor is it mentioned on campus tours. And it is certainly not one that every student will participate in. But for many students, the MoHo Chop is as much a part of their Mount Holyoke experience as Mountain Day or M&Cs.

Stephens responds to criticisms and controversy

Stephens responds to criticisms and controversy

BY MADELINE FITZGERALD ’21

Any mention of the name Sonya Stephens is sure to stir up a heated conversation. In student Facebook groups, memes and jokes criticizing her presidency abound. And in real life, she had a sparsely attended inauguration, where the few audience members were predominantly guests from other colleges. While Stephens’ personal conduct plays a major role in this controversy, the College and indeed the nation at large is experiencing a cultural upheaval. Mount Holyoke has become a microcosm for major debates involving the diversity of race, politics and gender.

Sonya’s story: From working-class roots to Cambridge University

Sonya’s story: From working-class roots to Cambridge University

BY MADELINE FITZGERALD ’21

This is the first in a two-part series on Sonya Stephens, Mount Holyoke’s newly appointed 19th president.

Warm. Kind. Funny. Aloof. Deceptive. Racist. In her three-year tenure as acting president of Mount Holyoke, a myriad of descriptors have been thrown at Sonya Stephens. She is alternatively depicted as a kindhearted academic striving for diversity and a closed-off fundraiser known among students for her perceived insensitivity. The Board of Trustees appointed her to the presidency with “unanimous enthusiasm” but her inauguration was sparsely attended, with fewer than 50 students present.