Poland outlaws references to their complicity in Holocaust

BY EMMA COOPER ’20

The President of Poland, Andrzej Duda, signed a bill that will make it illegal to call Holocaust death camps “Polish” on Feb. 6, 2018. According to The New York Times, failure to comply with the legislation will result in a fine or imprisonment for up to three years. 

Upcoming holidays

BY SAVANNAH HARRIMAN-POTE ’20

Feb. 12-18 — Maslenitsa

Maslenitsa is an Eastern Slavic folk holiday that takes place one week before the Russian Orthodox Lenten. According to NPR, the holiday is now tied to Christianity, but was initially celebrated by sun-worshippers to commemorate the lengthening of days and upcoming harvest of the spring season. Maslenitsa is often referred to as “Butter week” because of the abundance of blini, a warm, round Russian crepe that symbolizes the sun; they are usually drenched in butter. 

State of the Union addresses immigration

BY MAYA HOFFMAN ’20

On Jan. 30, Donald Trump delivered the State of the Union in the chamber of the United States House of Representatives. The speech was long, lasting approximately an hour and 20 minutes. Pauses were filled with loud standing ovations from one half of the room, while the other half remained seated. Despite the theatrics of the ceremonial event, Trump had a somber task at hand; as the second year of his term began, the president attempted to establish the State of the Union, the goals of American foreign policy and the fate of immigration under his administration.

Mi Gente, Shirley Chisholm and Mosaic LLCs focus on community

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20

The introduction of the Mi Gente floor will mark the third Living Learning Comminity (LLC) which welcomes students of Lantinx descent. This floor will join two floors opened in the fall of 2017: Mosaic floor, which welcomed all people of color (POC), and the Shirley Chisholm floor, which was specifically for students of the African diaspora. 

Worldwide Views: Keijing Jin

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20

Unlike many other international students at Mount Holyoke, Kejing (Momo) Jin ’19, from Beijing, China, has lived in the U.S. for five years. Jin attended a test-oriented high school in Beijing that did not appreciate her drive for academic excellence or her participation in extracurricular activities. “[Students] had ten classes a day, six days a week and everything was about scores because in China it’s still all about your college entrance examination score,” said Jin.

Ballistic missile scare highlights vulerability of the Pacific region

Ballistic missile scare highlights vulerability of the Pacific region

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’18

After months of conflict and Twitter warfare between President Trump and Kim Jong-un, residents and visitors of Hawaii were greeted by what appeared to be the culmination of North Korea’s nuclear threats: an emergency warning message, reading “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”

Cape Town to become first city without water

Cape Town to become first city without water

BY EMMA COOPER ’20

Cape Town, the second most populous city in South Africa, is on track to become the first major city in the world to run out of water. According to TIME Magazine, once the city dams reach 13.5 percent capacity, municipal water access will be cut off for homes and most businesses, an occurrence that is marked as “Day Zero.” According to the city’s estimates, it will occur around April 16 of this year. 

Student visa process poses threat to MHC international community

Student visa process poses threat to MHC international community

BY SAVANNAH HARRIMAN-POTE ’20

International students who choose to study at Mount Holyoke often travel thousands of miles from their home country to the United States, but their journey to the College begins long before they board a plane. According to the U.S. Department of State (DOS), citizens of other countries who wish to study at an institution of higher learning in the United States must first obtain a Nonimmigrant type F-1 visa.

Jhumka helps students decompress at Jhumba dance event

Jhumka helps students decompress at Jhumba dance event

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20

Jhumka was founded in 2006 as the first fusion dance group on campus, according to the College website. The dance group mixes hip-hop and Bollywood styles to create unique student-lead choreography each semester. They perform at events like VariAsians, Himalaya Night, Diwali celebrations, Pangy Day and UMass Asia Night. Last year, they even performed at Drag Ball, and hope to repeat the performance this year as well. 

Clothing drive aids Holyoke families

BY SAVANNAH HARRIMAN-POTE ’20

Dec. 6 marked the conclusion of the C.A.U.S.E. board’s three-week long winter apparel drive. According to their Facebook page, the C.A.U.S.E board will now give all Mount Holyoke students’ donations of “new or gently used winter clothing” to their two community partners in Holyoke, Enlace de Familias and Nueva Esperanza. 

Headlines from around the world

BY VICTORIA WANG ’20

Cambodia

Cambodia’s six-person national figure skating team competed at the Southeast Asia Games in Kuala Lumpur for the first time in August, according to the BBC. Unlike other Southeast Asian countries, such as Nepal, which regularly compete in winter sports, Cambodia only formed its national ice-skating team in 2015. Sen Bunthoeun, 27 and Khiev Panha, 23, were the first Cambodians to represent their country in a winter discipline at the Southeast Asian Games and placed eighth and ninth respectively, out of nine individual figure skaters. 

Newfound International Affairs Association fosters discussion

BY VICTORIA WANG ’20 

Every Thursday evening from 7 to 9 p.m., a group of students eat and engage in discussions about global politics in the international relations lounge in Skinner 101 Some of these students study international relations or politics and some are simply passionate about global affairs.

Worldwide Views: Sarjana Jaiswal '18

Worldwide Views: Sarjana Jaiswal '18

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20 

The first international student studied at Mount Holyoke in 1839, just two years after Mary Lyon opened her doors to educate women from all over the United States, according to the Mount Holyoke website. In the 2016- — 2017 school year, students from over 61 countries attended Mount Holyoke College. Because one person cannot speak for a whole community, the News seeks to tell the individual stories, like that of Sarjana Jaiswal ’18 from Lucknow, a city in Northern India.

Eight Catalonian independence leaders jailed, protests break out in central Barcelona

Eight Catalonian independence leaders jailed, protests break out in central Barcelona

BY VICTORIA WANG ’20

  A protest campaign broke out in St. James's Square in central Barcelona on Friday, Nov. 3. According to the BBC, the protest was triggered by legal action taken late Thursday afternoon by a Spanish judge, ordering the imprisonment of eight former Catalan government members for supporting Catalonia’s independence. 

Worldwide Views: Maha Mapara ’21

Worldwide Views: Maha Mapara ’21

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20

The first international student studied at Mount Holyoke in 1839, just two years after Mary Lyon opened the doors to educate women from all over the United States, according to the Mount Holyoke website. In the 2016 – 2017 school year students from over 61 countries attended Mount Holyoke College. Because one person cannot speak for a whole community, the News seeks to tell the individual stories like that of Maha Mapara, a first-year from Karachi, Pakistan.