New genetically modified mosquito species created to combat malaria

New genetically modified mosquito species created to combat malaria

BY VIVIAN LIVESAY ’21

A team of biologists at the Imperial College London have created genetically engineered mosquitoes that they believe could eliminate malaria by targeting a disease-carrying mosquito species, specifically Anopheles gambiae, which is native to sub-Saharan Africa.

Feature: Miller Worley Center for the Environment

Feature: Miller Worley Center for the Environment

BY TESS REMICK ’21

Since 1837, Mount Holyoke College has provided resources to students interested in science and engineering, fields in which women make up less than a third of the population, according to the Miller Worley Center website. Nearly 30 percent of Mount Holyoke students major in STEM fields; this is significantly higher than the number of women who study these subjects at comparable coeducational institutions.

Dr. Leana Wen selected as new president of Planned Parenthood

Dr. Leana Wen selected as new president of Planned Parenthood

BY CHEYENNE ELLIS ’21

Planned Parenthood has recently selected Dr. Leana Wen, a former emergency room doctor and current health commissioner for Baltimore, as their next president. Wen will assume the position with experience in patient and community activism, as well as hands-on medical experience. She will be the first physician to accept the role in over 50 years, according to the New York Times.

California pledges carbon neutrality by 2045

California pledges carbon neutrality by 2045

BY TESS REMICK ’21

This month, California approved their ambitious plan to rely on 100 percent clean electricity by 2045. . With its pledge, California has joined Hawaii as only the second state to commit to clean energy. Other states, including Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York and Washington D.C., are also looking into longterm renewable energy plans, according to the New York Times.

Social media usage can be harmful to a student’s self-esteem

Social media usage can be harmful to a student’s self-esteem

BY TESS REMICK ’21

Students from colleges and universities all over the world turn to social media as a place to connect with each other at the start of each new school year. Being away from home for the first time while having the chance to reinvent themselves results in students attempting to make new friends through social media apps. As a relatively small liberal arts college, students at Mount Holyoke have the opportunity to follow their peers’ lives through the lens of social media on a more intimate level than many.

Students pursue health and science-related internships and research

BY TESS REMICK ’21

As summer approaches, many Mount Holyoke students already have internships and research opportunities lined up. The following are profiles of a couple of students and their health and science - related plans. 

One-third of the Great Barrier Reef has died due to coral bleaching

One-third of the Great Barrier Reef has died due to coral bleaching

BY CHEYENNE ELLIS ’21

A new study discovered that an underwater heat wave two years ago resulted in the death of one-third of the Great Barrier Reef, according to The New York Times. Though the Reef is a physical and sedentary piece of the Australian underwater landscape, it is a living and vibrant collection of coral and other organisms. 

Senior Symposium showcased projects

BY SABRINA EDWARDS ’20

On Friday, April 13, students, faculty, staff, parents and friends convened in Kendade, Cleveland, Dwight and Reese to hear presentations on a variety of topics at the Senior Symposium. Held annually on campus, the Senior Symposium is a chance for seniors to share their academic interests and work in a panel-setting to the Mount Holyoke community. 

Physics professor awarded for research, to establish pre-college STEM program

Physics professor awarded for research, to establish pre-college STEM program

BY SABRINA EDWARDS ’20

Physics professor Kerstin Nordstrom was recently awarded a Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement to further her educational and lab-based goals, specifically her work on granular flows.

Cosmetics are full of unlabeled dangerous toxins

Cosmetics are full of unlabeled dangerous toxins

BY TESS REMICK ’21

While many college students rush to get ready in the morning, chances are the ingredients in their cosmetic products are the last thing on their minds — they’re concerned about putting it on their faces and making it to class on time. Paying attention to ingredient lists may seem like an unnecessary and tedious task, but ignoring it could have repercussions. Earlier this month, CNN reported that animal waste was one of the many toxins found in counterfeit makeup, or makeup produced to imitate brand name products.

Self-compassion is as important as self-care for finals stress relief

Self-compassion is as important as self-care for finals stress relief

BY TESS REMICK ’21

College students can easily feel anxious balancing school, work, friends and family while also trying to figure out the rest of their lives. For many, being on their own, maybe for the first time in their life, is difficult. Mix that with rigorous academic workloads and unhealthy sleeping habits and it can leave one’s mental health in a disastrous state. 

Judge rules that coffee should be labelled as a carcinogen

Judge rules that coffee should be labelled as a carcinogen

BY SABRINA EDWARDS ’20

In California, on March 28, Judge Elihu Berle ruled that coffee contains enough carcinogenic chemicals to merit labelling the drink itself as a carcinogen, much the way cigarettes are labelled. In the case, the judge ruled that the coffee retailer defendants, which included 7-Eleven and Starbucks, did not fully explain how the claimed health benefits of coffee outweighed the potential risks.

Flint, MI water crisis being addressed by federal spending by 2020

BY TESS REMICK ’21

On Feb. 25, 2015, Flint, Michigan resident Lee Anne Walters’ home’s water was tested for lead. The water’s lead content was almost seven times higher than the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s limit for lead in drinking water according to Michigan Radio.

Pacific Garbage Patch is larger than initially thought

Pacific Garbage Patch is larger than initially thought

BY CHEYENNE ELLIS ’21

A new study published in the Scientific Journal estimates that the total area of the so-called “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” is anywhere from four to 16 times as large as originally thought, according to The New York Times. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the world’s largest floating “junkyard” of trash, where plastics and other objects accumulate in mass quantities.

The national opioid epidemic spreads west, claiming lives in Pioneer Valley

The national opioid epidemic spreads west, claiming lives in Pioneer Valley

BY TESS REMICK ’21

The U.S. is facing the most lethal opioid crisis in its history. Between 2002 and 2016, the number of deadly overdoses related to heroin increased by 533 percent nationwide, according to CNN.

Women’s History Month: Dorothy Hansine Andersen (1901-1963)

Women’s History Month: Dorothy Hansine Andersen (1901-1963)

BY CHEYENNE ELLIS ’21

For National Women’s History Month, the Mount Holyoke College Archives and Special Collections are showing an exhibit on female faculty in the sciences, from Lydia Shattuck, class of 1851, to Cornelia Clapp, class of 1871.

Dr. Dorothy Hansine Andersen (1901-1963), class of 1922, was an accomplished American pathologist, known for first recognizing cystic fibrosis as a disease and creating a test to help diagnose it.

Bitcoin: What is it and why should we care?

Bitcoin: What is it and why should we care?

BY SABRINA EDWARDS ’20

Today’s internet and financial news outlets are awash with speculation and perspectives on bitcoin, the world’s most prominent cryptocurrency. But what is bitcoin and why do college students and recent college graduates care?

Women’s History Month: Virginia Apgar (1909-1974)

BY SABRINA EDWARDS ’20

For National Women’s History Month, the Mount Holyoke College Archives and Special Collections are showing an exhibit on female faculty in the sciences, from Lydia Shattuck, class of 1851, to Cornelia Clapp, class of 1871.

The Apgar test, developed by Virginia Apgar ’29, remains the standard test for the health of a newborn in maternity wards and postnatal clinics around the world.

Sleep deprivation is detrimental to student health and happiness

Sleep deprivation is detrimental to student health and happiness

BY CHEYENNE ELLIS ’21

College students today are struggling to maintain good grades, social lives and jobs, as well as a healthy sleep schedule. This has resulted in many college students being sleep deprived, especially around midterms and finals, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.