Friendships across social boundaries are difficult but essential

BY PRERNA CHAUDHARY ’22

I began to think critically about the role of race in friendship during my firstyear seminar, The Meaning of Friendship. Our Vice President of Student Life and Dean of Students, Marcella Runell Hall, is the professor for this class. We learned about social identities, which are the groups a person identifies with that shape their daily experiences. In Hall’s book, “UnCommon Bonds,” women of various social identities tell stories about friendships that bridge various social divides. Professor Sonia Nieto from UMass Amherst wrote that it is “not easy” to be friends with people different than you.

Being substance-free should be more accepted on campus

Being substance-free should be more accepted on campus

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

When I went to Spain right after my 18th birthday, I was so excited to drink for the first time. My friend group in high school wasn’t particularly reckless (the only illegal thing we ever did together was pirate “Frozen” the day after its release), so I had never even had a sip of alcohol before then. Lucky for me, I tried my first alcoholic beverage in a country with some of the best wine in the world. It tasted so good that I would have a glass almost every time we went out to dinner.

Paving the path for a representative Congress

Paving the path for a representative Congress

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Last Tuesday’s election saw many historic successes for women of color, including the election of the first NativeAmerican and Muslim women to Congress. These results have garnered support and celebration, as we, women of color, are finally seeing ourselves represented in legislative bodies.

Ending birthright citizenship is unethical (and unconstitutional)

Ending birthright citizenship is unethical (and unconstitutional)

BY NINA LARBI ’22

In late October, Donald Trump informed the nation of an executive order he was preparing that would eliminate birthright citizenship, the amendment that currently grants citizenship to anyone born on U.S. territory. His reasoning was simple: that America is the only country to have birthright citizenship (this is false; around 30 other countries share this law).

Our bodies are not for the male gaze, especially on Mountain Day

BY MEI FUJIMORI-HENDERSON ’22

“Oh my God, you guys look so great!”

Peals of laughter erupted from my four shirtless friends as they posed with their naked backs to the camera, fronts facing the beautiful landscape of the valley below. I couldn’t help but smile as they continued to pose in different angles, careful not to flash the camera.

Restricting inmate voting furthers disenfranchisement in communities of color

Restricting inmate voting furthers disenfranchisement in communities of color

BY CHLOE JENSEN ’20

This November, Democrats have the chance to vote out the Republican majority in Congress. For many liberals, this is an important opportunity to elect officials who will overturn many of the policies that Republican lawmakers have passed and replace them with their own more progressive legislation. An unrepresented voice in these elections will be inmates and former inmates, many of whom are affected by these very policies.

Sociopolitical themes and messages define the horror genre

BY EMILY ROLES-FOTSO ’21

Few film genres have as much cultural significance and power as horror. That is why it’s rare to find someone who feels ambivalent towards the genre; most people are either enthusiastic fans or vehement opponents. Some are afraid, some can’t stomach the violence and disturbing imagery that characterize the genre, but others simply don’t take it seriously, dismissing horror as shallow or sensational. What they fail to see is that horror movies speak to the most fundamental fears of humanity, and often have deep roots in both pop culture and the political sphere.

Donald Trump, get my neighborhood out of your damn mouth

BY MADDY RITTER ’20

Jewish people make up about 2 percent of the U.S. population. Though a tiny minority of the overall United States, we typically exist in clusters in and around cities, both for our survival and for a sense of community. One of these clusters is Squirrel Hill in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania — this is where I was raised as a secular Jew.

What does tenure really protect?

BY NADIA BABAR '19

In the three years I’ve attended Mount Holyoke, I’ve encountered more than one scandal involving a professor exhibiting, to put it lightly, questionable behavior. And each time, I’ve encountered the same reasoning for why the professor will face no accountability for their actions: “Well, they’ve got tenure.”

Our campus community must now think radically, not reactively

BY ZOË BARNSTONE-CLARK ’19

The recent allegations against a current Mount Holyoke professor by alumna Ruth D’Eredita ’84 sparked discussion at the executive board meeting of Mount Holyoke’s Amnesty International Chapter on Oct. 14. We chose to email the administration expressing concerns about their actions and requested they facilitate an open dialogue with students. We also contacted D’Eredita to voice our support and informed her of our intent to meet with the administration, asking if there was any specific action we could take on her behalf.

Backlash against the #MeToo movement in India misses the point

BY SRISHTI MUKHERJEE ’21

The end of 2017 saw the beginning of the #MeToo movement in Hollywood. The following year saw the movement extend to parts of the world where many people considered it little more than a faraway fantasy. In India, home of the world’s largest film industry, the effects of #MeToo have slowly begun to unfold. The last few days have brought a severe case of déjà vu for most Indians, as daily revelations of famous mens’ infamous pasts have come to light.

The current call-out culture on campus is unproductive

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Between studying for upcoming midterms and writing uninspiring papers, I spent my fall break watching MTV’s “Daria.” Since the show’s end in 2002, the character has been turned into an icon of absolute apathy, which is odd because the series clearly attempted to do more than exhibit her emotionlessness. Although Daria is presented as somewhat apathetic, with an “I’m surrounded by idiots” sort of mentality, she works to address the issues she sees in a constructive manner. If your animated hero does not recommend misanthropy, why should you?

Theft on campus creates distrust

Theft on campus creates distrust

BY MIMI HUCKINS ’21

Mount Holyoke’s students are supposed to abide by the Honor Code, which should allow them to trust their peers. This doesn’t mean their peers are always trustworthy. Among the recent rain spell, students’ umbrellas have been stolen left and right. Seemingly, the only solution is to post in a Facebook group and pray that someone may find or return it.

Why does the Senate refuse to believe women like Dr. Ford?

Why does the Senate refuse to believe women like Dr. Ford?

BY SRISHTI MUKHERJEE ’21

People both in the U.S. and abroad fixated on their TV screens as the chilling testimonials of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Judge Brett Kavanaugh aired on Thursday, Sept. 27. This hearing is one of the main deciding factors in whether an alleged perpetrator of sexual violence will earn a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court.