Nina Larbi

Reparations for slavery are more feasible than many Americans believe

BY NINA LARBI ’22

One of the issues dividing the ballot in the 2020 election is slavery reparations. The concept has always had an ambiguous definition, but fundamentally, it entitles compensation — usually financial — for the descendants of slaves, meant to make amends for the centuries of brutality Americans faced under slavery and their economic and legal disenfranchisement thereafter.

North Africans’ identities as African should be respected

North Africans’ identities as African should be respected

BY NINA LARBI ’22

The North African identity is complex and often goes unrecognized. Those who identify as North African are consistently labeled as Middle Eastern, Muslim or simply as ambiguously brown. We are grouped together with the Middle East most frequently, aggregated under the acronym MENA (Middle East and North Africa). Whatever the label is, it is hardly ever “African.” Today, “African” has become synonymous with “black.” This is not to dismiss anyone else’s pride or identity, but we as North Africans are Africans, too. Despite racial and cultural differences, North Af- rica should be considered part of Africa rather than an extension of the Middle East. The mindset that the Maghreb — the Northern region of Africa, including Morocco, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia and Mauritania — functions as part of the Middle East damages North African identity and degrades ethnic pride in the region.

Blaming affirmative action ignores the influence of legacy and bribery

BY NINA LARBI’22

High schoolers across the nation are waiting anxiously for their college acceptance letters. When they receive their decisions, the agonizing often isn’t over. Students wonder why they did not get accepted by MIT while their friends did, or why they did not get enough financial aid from the University of Pittsburgh while their classmate got a full ride.

The backlash against Marie Kondo comes from a place of prejudice

BY NINA LARBI ’22

“Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” has taken the world by storm. In the series, Marie Kondo, a Japanese author and organizing consultant, travels to the homes of disorganized Americans and aids them in cleaning their homes using her Shinto-inspired Kon-Mari method. Kondo has faced backlash for her methods, and this negative reaction is not only incurred from random individuals on the internet; prominent figures like Jimmy Kimmel and Ellen DeGeneres are also treating her with disrespect. The hatred directed towards Kondo is rooted in racism and a sense of American superiority, and this prejudice is coming from both sides of the political spectrum.

Unhealthy drinking habits are too normalized on college campuses

Unhealthy drinking habits are too normalized on college campuses

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Being new to college, I still find it jarring when I go on social media and see people I have known since we were seven years old posting pictures of themselves completely plastered in their white-brick dorm rooms, complete with cheap IPA. Maybe it is because I was part of the overachiever clique in high school, so the most risky thing that any of us did was watch an R-rated movie when we were 15, but it’s just plain weird to see your old friends become social alcoholics, all documented by Instagram and Snapchat.

Rebranding makeup as “self-expression” perpetuates conformity

Rebranding makeup as “self-expression” perpetuates conformity

BY NINA LARBI ’22

This year, I succumbed to capitalist America and went Black Friday shopping at a local mall in my hometown. Although I left the hellscape that is the Willow Grove Mall’s Sephora empty-handed and with my pitiful $20 bill still tucked into my wallet, I could not stop thinking about the advertisements, the environment, the staff and the store itself. Advertisements in the store displayed bright makeup looks, from red eyeshadow to purple highlighter, and showcased a diverse cast of models.

Paving the path for a representative Congress

Paving the path for a representative Congress

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Last Tuesday’s election saw many historic successes for women of color, including the election of the first NativeAmerican and Muslim women to Congress. These results have garnered support and celebration, as we, women of color, are finally seeing ourselves represented in legislative bodies.

Ending birthright citizenship is unethical (and unconstitutional)

Ending birthright citizenship is unethical (and unconstitutional)

BY NINA LARBI ’22

In late October, Donald Trump informed the nation of an executive order he was preparing that would eliminate birthright citizenship, the amendment that currently grants citizenship to anyone born on U.S. territory. His reasoning was simple: that America is the only country to have birthright citizenship (this is false; around 30 other countries share this law).

The current call-out culture on campus is unproductive

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Between studying for upcoming midterms and writing uninspiring papers, I spent my fall break watching MTV’s “Daria.” Since the show’s end in 2002, the character has been turned into an icon of absolute apathy, which is odd because the series clearly attempted to do more than exhibit her emotionlessness. Although Daria is presented as somewhat apathetic, with an “I’m surrounded by idiots” sort of mentality, she works to address the issues she sees in a constructive manner. If your animated hero does not recommend misanthropy, why should you?