The Asian “model minority” stereotype is not all-encompassing

BY PRERNA CHAUDHARY ’22

Due to the perception that many Asian-Americans have achieved conventional forms of success, like attending highly ranked colleges and having a high income compared to the national average, thus achieving the “American Dream,” they are often stereotyped to be the “model minority” of the United States.

The “non-liberal arts” 12-credit limit is unnecessary and limiting

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

Towards the end of the add-drop period for this semester, I received a confusing email from the Office of the Registrar. It read: “you are close to reaching the Non-Liberal Arts limit at Mount Holyoke. This means that you are close to maximum amount (12 credits) of classes in the CUSP [curricular support] or non-liberal arts designation that you can count toward your 128 credit requirement.”

Reparations for slavery are more feasible than many Americans believe

BY NINA LARBI ’22

One of the issues dividing the ballot in the 2020 election is slavery reparations. The concept has always had an ambiguous definition, but fundamentally, it entitles compensation — usually financial — for the descendants of slaves, meant to make amends for the centuries of brutality Americans faced under slavery and their economic and legal disenfranchisement thereafter.

Heavily grading class participation ignores students with anxiety

Heavily grading class participation ignores students with anxiety

BY MIMI HUCKINS ’21

In my junior year of high school I had the same conversation with a teacher that I always had to. We had just split up the class for two separate, smaller discussions and I had not spoken. While we retreated back to our classroom after the brief conversation, the teacher made a remark about me not participating. “I’m trying,” I said timidly. He scoffed and said, “Really?” I spent the rest of the class trying not to cry.

North Africans’ identities as African should be respected

North Africans’ identities as African should be respected

BY NINA LARBI ’22

The North African identity is complex and often goes unrecognized. Those who identify as North African are consistently labeled as Middle Eastern, Muslim or simply as ambiguously brown. We are grouped together with the Middle East most frequently, aggregated under the acronym MENA (Middle East and North Africa). Whatever the label is, it is hardly ever “African.” Today, “African” has become synonymous with “black.” This is not to dismiss anyone else’s pride or identity, but we as North Africans are Africans, too. Despite racial and cultural differences, North Af- rica should be considered part of Africa rather than an extension of the Middle East. The mindset that the Maghreb — the Northern region of Africa, including Morocco, Algeria, Libya, Tunisia and Mauritania — functions as part of the Middle East damages North African identity and degrades ethnic pride in the region.

Drag Ball needs to be more accessible to QTPOC

BY SAACHI KHANDPUR ’22

As a first-year student, I was told that Drag Ball was not to be missed. Drag Ball is a party and drag show that has been hosted by Familia, Mount Holyoke’s support network for queer and trans people of color (QTPOC), since 2017. It is an event meant to create a safe space for QTPOC on campus.

Blaming affirmative action ignores the influence of legacy and bribery

BY NINA LARBI’22

High schoolers across the nation are waiting anxiously for their college acceptance letters. When they receive their decisions, the agonizing often isn’t over. Students wonder why they did not get accepted by MIT while their friends did, or why they did not get enough financial aid from the University of Pittsburgh while their classmate got a full ride.

The return of the Jonas Brothers profits off your nostalgia

The return of the Jonas Brothers profits off your nostalgia

BY MIMI HUCKINS ’21

A typical morning for me in 2009 would begin when I boarded the school bus, often in my Camp Rock t-shirt, listening to the Jonas Brothers’ album “A Little Bit Longer” on my purple iPod Nano. The Jonas Brothers defined a very memorable period of my life. Nick Jonas was my first celebrity crush. I threw a fit when my mom wouldn’t let me buy a Camp Rock duvet cover which featured extremely enlarged faces of each brother.

Autism Speaks does not deserve its negative reputation

BY CHRIS CASSIDY ’20

My brother Zach has autism. Over the past few years, he has aged out of school services and is now receiving what are called “adult services” by the state of Vermont. This has come with mixed success and the realization that there really aren’t any “adult services.” We are working to find a permanent living situation for Zach before my parents become too old to take care of him. Between meetings with the state, program research, finding money for services, doctor’s appointments and making sure someone is supervising Zach, my family is exhausted.

Students should be trusted when asking for accommodations

BY GWYNETH SPINCKEN ’21

Today, the average college or university offers some version of disability services, and most encourage students in need to access this aid. These accommodations allow for more equitable treatment for students with disabilities. The support is vital, and without it, professors would overlook many students with the potential to make meaningful contributions to their college or university by not properly supporting them. Additionally, students would be punished unfairly for their disabilities and suffer from lower grades for something they have little to no control over.

Crowded Democratic primary race may result in Trump victory

Crowded Democratic primary race may result in Trump victory

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21]

The Democratic primary race for the 2020 election is already likely to be the largest in history, according to TIME Magazine. There are currently 12 Democrats who have declared their candidacy and, according to the New York Times, there are 14 more who may declare soon. I believe that the sheer number of candidates will split the Democratic party and allow Donald Trump to win another term as president.

The backlash against Marie Kondo comes from a place of prejudice

BY NINA LARBI ’22

“Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” has taken the world by storm. In the series, Marie Kondo, a Japanese author and organizing consultant, travels to the homes of disorganized Americans and aids them in cleaning their homes using her Shinto-inspired Kon-Mari method. Kondo has faced backlash for her methods, and this negative reaction is not only incurred from random individuals on the internet; prominent figures like Jimmy Kimmel and Ellen DeGeneres are also treating her with disrespect. The hatred directed towards Kondo is rooted in racism and a sense of American superiority, and this prejudice is coming from both sides of the political spectrum.

“Non-Western” and “Western” names deserve equal respect

BY PRERNA CHAUDHARY ’22

I first saw South Asian American political commentator and comedian Hasan Minhaj on “The Daily Show” as a senior correspondent in 2014. He introduced himself then as “has-AHN min-AJ.” When he said his name on his own Net ix special, “Hasan Min- haj: Homecoming King,” he pronounced it “HUS-un.” Now, four years later, when I watch his Net ix show, “Patriot Act,” he says “I’m HUS-un meen-AAJ,” which is the actual pronunciation of his name.

Unhealthy drinking habits are too normalized on college campuses

Unhealthy drinking habits are too normalized on college campuses

BY NINA LARBI ’22

Being new to college, I still find it jarring when I go on social media and see people I have known since we were seven years old posting pictures of themselves completely plastered in their white-brick dorm rooms, complete with cheap IPA. Maybe it is because I was part of the overachiever clique in high school, so the most risky thing that any of us did was watch an R-rated movie when we were 15, but it’s just plain weird to see your old friends become social alcoholics, all documented by Instagram and Snapchat.

College rankings do not matter

On the list titled “2019 Best National Liberal Arts Colleges” by U.S. News, Mount Holyoke College ranks at No. 30. Niche ranked it at No. 33, and Forbes said it was No. 49. Why does our college ranking vary so widely on different lists? Different rankings are based on different criteria, and between the lists, the same criteria is weighted differently. While some ranking systems measure “reputation, resources and selectivity,” others measure “student satisfaction” and “post graduate success.” There is little agreement or standardization between the lists that far too many young students use to determine their future schools.

Say no to Joe! The danger of romanticizing fictional stalkers

Say no to Joe! The danger of romanticizing fictional stalkers

BY SRISHTI MUKHERJEE ’21

Many of us have already squandered a couple of hours in the past month to binge on Netflix’s latest viral offering: the original thriller “You.” In true American fashion, “You” features an exceedingly attractive cast. Joe Goldberg (Penn Badgley, “Gossip Girl”), is a stalker who incessantly pursues his blonde love interest, Guinevere Beck (Elizabeth Lail, “Once Upon a Time”). Joe’s peculiar and distasteful personality is made apparent to viewers from the get-go. And yet, an alarming number of people seem to be attracted to his character.