Regina Spektor performs solo set in Northampton

Regina Spektor performs solo set in Northampton

BY EMILY BLOMQUIST ’18

“I love Paris in the rain! I love Northampton in the rain!” sang singer-songwriter Regina Spektor in Smith College’s John M. Greene Hall last Tuesday night. Northampton is just one stop of many on the native Muscovite’s fall 2017 U.S. tour dubbed a “A Very Special Solo Performance.” 

Dance concert moves performers and students

Dance concert moves performers and students

BY AHLIA DUNN ’20

Last week, the Mount Holyoke dance department held their annual faculty dance concert in the Kendall Sports and Dance Complex. The show featured student performances choreographed by faculty from Mount Holyoke and some of the Five Colleges. The show’s program describes the Five College dance department and the event as a “collaboration founded on a commitment to honor, respect and support the individual perspectives on dance characteristic of each campus.” 

Mother Nature spotlighted at open mic

Mother Nature spotlighted at open mic

BY SARAH OLSEN ’18

The Thirsty Mind stage was in the spotlight Sunday as students celebrated Mother Nature with an open mic event. Hosted by the Mount Holyoke College International Student Organizing Committee (ISOC), the event, titled “Mother Nature,” featured students performing music and poetry that explored the topic. 

     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Graphic by of Carrie Clowers ’18  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21  In the days leading up to Halloween the campus was quiet as students, curled up in blankets and munched on Eggos, preparing for the second season of “Stranger Things.” The long-awaited season managed to be as fast-paced and mind-boggling as its predecessor, staying true to the show’s retro style and lovable characters while taking the drama to new heights. This resulted in a stellar season that was worth the wait. According to Variety, the first episode was viewed 15.8 million times within the first three days after its release, and there were 7.2 million posts about the season on Facebook and Twitter.  After Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown, “NCIS”)  disappears at the end of the first season, Will (Noah Schnapp, “The Peanuts Movie”), Mike (Finn Wolfhard, “It”), Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin, “Blue Bloods”) and Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo, “The Blacklist”) are together again, but nothing is the same. Mike is unable to move on from Eleven, calling her every day on his walkie talkie. Will has disturbing visions of the Upside Down that feel too real to be flashbacks. Lucas and Dustin find themselves pining over the same girl, Max (Sadie Sink, “American Odyssey”), a new student who skateboards and wows them with her arcade game prowess.   Meanwhile, unknown to all, Jim Hopper (David Harbour, “Brokeback Mountain”) is hiding Eleven in a cabin in the woods until things calm down. The dynamic between Hopper and Eleven is heartwarming, but also intense. While Hopper is desperate for a daughter and Eleven wants a father, Hopper’s overprotective instincts make Eleven feel trapped. The fights between the two characters are some of the most powerful scenes of the season with Hopper’s strong will going up against Eleven’s powers.   The drama of the season begins to unfold when Will becomes possessed by the antagonist of the season, the Mind Flayer. Once again, Hawkins is the target of an otherworldly attack, this one deadlier than the last.    In addition to solid performances from the well-loved cast, season two introduces new characters whose unique storylines helped the season distinguish itself from the first. Initially, Max was the epitome of the “she’s not like the other girls” trope, but as the season progressed she won me over. She’s distrusting and irritable, but recognizes her faults. As the show continues, Max becomes a necessary part of the team. While her character is a strong addition to the cast, her stepbrother Billy (Dacre Montgomery, “Power Rangers”) is one of the weakest. In “Beyond Stranger Things,” a set of interviews taking viewers behind-the-scenes, one of the show’s creators, Matt Duffer, explained that they “wanted this human antagonist … someone who was kind of irredeemable and a bit of a sociopath.” Unfortunately, Billy isn’t well developed and doesn’t contribute anything valuable to the plot. For example, his ill treatment and hatred of Lucas isn’t explained or acknowledged by other characters. After seeing Max with Lucas, Billy says “There are certain type of people in this world that you stay away from, and that kid, Max, that kid is one of them.” Billy had never interacted with Lucas before.   “I think he feels threatened,” Montgomery said of his character in an interview with the Huffington Post. “Max is that one constant he knows he needs to drop off and look after. . . It’s that animalistic side of like, ‘You’re threatening my sibling, my world. What are you doing? Who is this boy who’s trying to weave his way into my life through my sister?’” But Montgomery’s comment doesn’t explain Billy’s apparent hatred for his sister as he threatens to make Max skateboard home and refuses to look after her while their parents are gone. Hopefully the character will contribute more to the plot in future seasons.  According to Vulture, the Duffer Brothers have confirmed that there will be at least a third and a fourth season. This season ended neatly, so it’s difficult to see where the show will go from here. But the Duffer Brothers have proven their ability to expand the show while retaining its lovable qualities, so I think it’s safe to say we have something to look forward to.

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

In the days leading up to Halloween the campus was quiet as students, curled up in blankets and munched on Eggos, preparing for the second season of “Stranger Things.” The long-awaited season managed to be as fast-paced and mind-boggling as its predecessor, staying true to the show’s retro style and lovable characters while taking the drama to new heights. This resulted in a stellar season that was worth the wait. According to Variety, the first episode was viewed 15.8 million times within the first three days after its release, and there were 7.2 million posts about the season on Facebook and Twitter.

Orchestra offers double performance of Monsters Ball

Orchestra offers double performance of Monsters Ball

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

Abbey Chapel was decorated with skeleton bones, cobwebs and spiders last Saturday for the annual Monsters Ball. The outer space-themed concert, put on by the Mount Holyoke Orchestra, was, featured celestial music and the orchestra’s conductor, Tian Hui Ng, wore an astronaut suit. Members of the orchestra and many audience members also dressed up for Saturday’s two performances, The Kids’ Monsters Ball and Monsters Ball. 

Jazz Concert honors Ella Fitzgerald

Jazz Concert honors Ella Fitzgerald

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

During Family and Friends weekend, Chapin Auditorium hosted a crowd of parents and students for “Ella’s Swell-a!,” a concert put on by the Mount Holyoke Jazz Society in honor of Ella Fitzgerald and what would have been her 100th birthday. The concert featured the Mount Holyoke College Jazz Ensembles with Big Band, Vocal and Chamber Jazz. The ensembles played a variety of songs, including recognizable Fitzgerald hits “What’s Your Story, Morning Glory?” and “Summertime.”

Mount Holy Vogue: The Free Bin Femme

Mount Holy Vogue: The Free Bin Femme

BY MARIANA JARAMILLO ’20

Despite being a millennial, sophomore Annabelle Plowden’s wardrobe is able to emulate the 90’s style of Kurt Cobain. With a head of green hair, Plowden is hard to miss on campus. She leads a busy life that requires a comfortable wardrobe that still allows her to express her rebellious attitude.  Like most people, Plowden doesn’t put a lot of thought into her clothes but is still subliminally inspired by all the media she consumes and by what she sees people around her wearing. 

K-Pop group’s new album disappoints

K-Pop group’s new album disappoints

BY RACHEL KIM ’21

The Korean pop group BTS, or Beyond the Scene, has been topping charts, winning awards and making history worldwide since their debut as a seven-member South Korean boy band in 2013. Hailed for their explosive choreography, inventive music videos and lyrics that criticize society, it’s no surprise that BTS is the new face of today’s international K-pop craze.  According to Gaon music chart, the group’s latest album, “Love Yourself: Her,” released on Sept. 18, 2017, sold an impressive 1.2 million albums in South Korea.  Despite its commercial success, in comparison to BTS’ previous albums, “Love Yourself: Her” is a disappointing diversion from the group’s original sound and spirit.

Demi Lovato is “Simply Complicated” in new documentary

Demi Lovato is “Simply Complicated” in new documentary

BY SARAH OLSEN ’18

“I went on like a bender for like two months where I was using daily. There was one night where I used a bunch of coke and I popped a few Xanax bars and I started to choke a little bit, my heart started racing, and I remember thinking, ‘Oh my God, I might be overdosing right now.’”

Victory Eights celebrate 75th anniversary with music and memories

Victory Eights celebrate 75th anniversary with music and memories

BY AHLIA DUNN

Current members and alums of the Mount Holyoke a cappella group, the Victory Eights, gathered for a concert in Chapin Auditorium on Saturday to celebrate the group’s 75th anniversary. The V8s are the oldest historically all-female collegiate a cappella group in the nation. Saturday’s event reunited current members with members from the 80s, 90s and 2000s.

Theater Department creates a monster with FRANKENSTEIN

BY SARAH OLSEN '18

The Mount Holyoke College department of theatre arts has craeated a spectacular monster with its production of FRANKENSTEIN. Directed by Noah Tuleja, the play is Jonathan Yukich’s adaptation of Mary Shelley’s famous novel. The production reanimates the torturous relationship between Dr. Victor Frankenstein and his creation, the Creature, with standout performances by Julia Cole ’19 and Tamia Williams ’19.

Saturday Night Live’s Season 43 premieres

Saturday Night Live’s Season 43 premieres

BY CAMERON CAPELLO '21

“Live from New York, it’s Saturday Night!”

Arguably television’s most recognizable catch-phrase, Saturday Night Live has been making people laugh for decades, and this weekend was no exception. During their Season 43 premiere, hosted by Ryan Gosling, SNL touched on current events, including the NFL, alien invasions and Donald Trump.

Museum Sightlines Tour explores dreams with art

Museum Sightlines Tour explores dreams with art

BY CAMERON CAPELLO ’21

This weekend the Mount Holyoke Art Museum displayed a collection of pieces depicting the confusing yet entrancing state of dreams. The tour, “Dream States: Exploring the Subconscious,” was curated by Katia Kiefaber ’17 and showcased four pieces, each representing a different meaning of the word “dream.” 

Mount Holy Vogue: The Retro Minimalist

Mount Holy Vogue: The Retro Minimalist

BY MARIANA JARAMILLO '20 

Ellie Dolan ’18 is a Film Studies major with a truly eclectic fashion sense, who loves to showcase her style. From a young age, Dolan was always drawn to bright colors and patterns, but as she’s grown so has her style. After studying abroad in London last fall, her approach to fashion has adapted to the city’s utilitarian, yetchic vibe. She combines spirited patterns, solid colors and accessories to showcase a signature piece, while still being prepared for the day.

Daniel Caesar explores love, loss and independence in “Freudian”

Daniel Caesar explores love, loss and independence in “Freudian”

BY AHLIA DUNN ’20

Toronto R&B singer-songwriter Daniel Caesar’s debut EP, “Freudian,” is a journey through love and human error set to bluesy, gospel-inspired tracks. The 10-track album, released on Aug. 27, fits right into the neo-soul revival bringing soulful sounds to a mainstream audience.