Hey Gamers: Three standouts from the BAFTA Game Awards

Hey Gamers: Three standouts from the BAFTA Game Awards

BY KIRAN PENMAN ’19

Last week, the British Academy Games Awards held their 15th ceremony at Queen Elizabeth Hall in London. The show is dedicated to honoring the best of gaming each year across a variety of genres and platforms. To continue the celebration of 2019’s creative achievements in gaming, I’ve provided you with a little list of great independent mobile games featured at the awards show that you should definitely try out this week!

Sci-fi classic “The Twilight Zone” is back on the air

Sci-fi classic “The Twilight Zone” is back on the air

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

CBS and Jordan Peele have reimagined Rod Serling’s classic science fiction anthology “The Twilight Zone” and released the first episode on April 1. Given Peele’s impressive work creating unsettling tales “Get Out” and “Us,” the reboot of this cult favorite is a fitting next project for the star director. Peele’s skill for reflecting the horrors of reality in his work is evident in the new season of “The Twilight Zone.”

Mount Holyoke hosts Five College Jazz Festival

Mount Holyoke hosts Five College Jazz Festival

BY EMMA MARTIN ’20

Rain and gloom outside the windows of the Blanchard Great Room set the scene for a cozy day of jazz last Friday, March 29 at the Five College Jazz Festival. Throughout the day, a steady stream of guests enjoyed jazz styles from various regions and time periods on the Great Room stage. Free and open to the public, the festival was an all-day opportunity to hear live jazz from groups representing the Five College music community.

“Queer Eye” Season 3: Fab Five promote self-love in Missouri

“Queer Eye” Season 3: Fab Five promote self-love in Missouri

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

Netflix released the eagerly anticipated third season of “Queer Eye” on March 15, providing the perfect binge-watch for this spring break. The Fab Five are back to “zhoosh” up Kansas City, MO. This season, Antoni, Bobby, Jonathan, Karamo and Tan bring a new sense of hope and confidence to nine new ‘heroes.’

Jordan Peele’s “Us” isn’t perfect, but it’s a pretty damn good horror film

Jordan Peele’s “Us” isn’t perfect, but it’s a pretty damn good horror film

BY KIRAN PENMAN ’19

From director Jordan Peele’s growing body of work, it’s becoming increasingly obvious that there is no better choice for the voice of the new CBS “Twilight Zone” series. Peele’s first film, “Get Out,” demonstrated that he is a master at crafting tales of horror and intrigue. “Get Out” was achieved with undeniable cleverness; there’s a kind of art to the way he weaves his films’ plot together, where everything seems to have a setup and a payoff. Peele takes great care with detail, a fact which is equally clear in his latest film “Us,” which follows the story of a family on vacation who are confronted by their own doppelgangers

Solange’s “When I Get Home” an ode to black Texans

BY JAHIYA CLARK ’20

Singer-songwriter Solange Knowles released her fourth studio album, “When I Get Home,” and accompanying 33-minute video, “A Texas Film,” on March 1. From black cowboys to afrofuturistic visions of her hometown of Houston, Solange constructs her album in praise of black Southern life. She uses sounds from today’s mainstream music that are easy to sing and dance along to, while her style and lyricism create something completely new.

Cornell joins MHC Glee for Brahms’ Requiem

Cornell joins MHC Glee for Brahms’ Requiem

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

The Mount Holyoke College and Cornell University Glee Clubs were joined by a community orchestra to present Johannes Brahms’ “Ein Deutsches Requiem” last Saturday, March 23. A German composer from the Romantic period, Brahms wrote the piece between 1865 and 1868.

Mary Lambert brings new poetry to Hampshire stage

BY EMMA COOPER ’20

“For those of you who have not yet experienced the power and impact of her words — prepare yourselves,” said the announcer on the makeshift stage in the Hampshire College Robert Crown Center. “Mary Lambert makes you feel a lot of emotions.” On March 2, Lambert performed from her recently released book of poetry, “Shame Is an Ocean I Swim Across,” at Hampshire College’s 10th annual Five College Queer, Gender and Sexuality Conference. The Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter, musician and spoken word artist showcased her wide array of talents throughout the night by setting her poems to music.

Hostless 2019 Oscars rises above controversy and upsets

Hostless 2019 Oscars rises above controversy and upsets

BY SABA FIAZUDDIN ’21

The 91st Academy Awards took place on Sunday night, marking the culmination of a monthslong awards season. The Academy managed to land itself in so many controversies in the weeks leading up to the night that it seemed highly likely that the show would sink into oblivion before reaching Sunday. The fact that the show managed to be one of the most engaging Academy Awards ceremonies in recent years is a testament to its structural changes.

Civil Rights love story “Beale Street” is a call for justice

Civil Rights love story “Beale Street” is a call for justice

BY EMILY ROLES FOTSO ’21

Based on James Baldwin’s classic novel of the same name, Barry Jenkins’ (“Moonlight”) “If Beale Street Could Talk” tells the story of a young Black couple, Tish (Kiki Layne) and Fonny (Stephan James). After Fonny is falsely accused of rape and sent to jail, Tish discovers she is pregnant with his child, and she and her family set out to do whatever it takes to prove his innocence

“The Importance of Being Earnest” still a relevant classic

“The Importance of Being Earnest” still a relevant classic

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

The Department of Theatre Arts presented “The Importance of Being Earnest” last weekend with spectacular success, drawing huge audiences. A classic by Oscar Wilde, the play is a biting and witty satire of Victorian society.

“The Favourite” is an absurd, female-driven masterpiece

BY ERIN CARBERRY ’19

Given the Academy’s history of favoritism toward period dramas, it may not come as a surprise to even a casual filmgoer that “The Favourite,” a historical dramedy set in early eighteenth-century England, holds this year’s crown for most Academy Award nominations with a whopping ten potential trophies.

“GIRLS” is just the beginning for rising star Yung Baby Tate

“GIRLS” is just the beginning for rising star Yung Baby Tate

BY EMILY ROLES FOTSO ’21

Tate Farris, better known by her stage name Yung Baby Tate, released her debut studio album “GIRLS” this February, a 39-minute homage to womanhood and self-love. Since her beginnings as a producer in 2009, the Atlanta singer and rapper has combined pop, hip-hop and R&B elements to create a fun, unique and catchy sound. Long-awaited after the release of her first EP “ROYGBIV” in 2015, “GIRLS” does not disappoint, combining her youthful sound and rap and production skills to create a promising first work full of potential.

American Ballet Theatre performs on campus

American Ballet Theatre performs on campus

BY EMMA MARTIN ’20

The traveling American Ballet Theatre Studio Company performed to receptive audiences in the Kendall Studio Theater last Friday and Saturday. The 12 young dancers were met with gasps, murmurs and extended applause from the crowd in the small, dark space as they performed six stunning, diverse pieces.

Women in White: Democrats make a statement at SOTU

Women in White: Democrats make a statement at SOTU

BY TESS TUITOEK ’21

In 1913, labor lawyer Inez Milholland Boissevain, a suffragist and World War I correspondent, rode down Pennsylvania Avenue on a white horse sporting a white cape to lead a suffrage parade in the nation’s capital. More than a hundred years later, women in Congress wore their own version of white armor to the State of the Union Address to make a bold and effective fashion statement.

WMHC brings local bands to campus for concert

WMHC brings local bands to campus for concert

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

Last Thursday, Feb. 7, WMHC hosted DIY bands BIG MOOD, DUMP HIM and Told Slant in the Blanchard Great Room. The concert drew a large crowd from the Five College community. Based in Amherst, BIG MOOD describe themselves as “wmass thot rock.” DUMP HIM is a “pop punk queercore revival” band from Northampton and Told Slant is an indie-pop group from Brooklyn, NY.

Cricketers cause controversy on “Koffee with Karan”

Cricketers cause controversy on “Koffee with Karan”

BY SHLOKA GIDWANI ’22

“Koffee with Karan,” hosted by famous Bollywood director and producer Karan Johar, is the longest running talk show in India. Every week, Johar interviews famous personalities including Bollywood actors, filmmakers and sports stars. The interviews, casual conversations about celebrities’ personal, professional and romantic lives, are always conducted over a cup of coffee.