Review

“The Importance of Being Earnest” still a relevant classic

“The Importance of Being Earnest” still a relevant classic

BY SABRYNA COPPOLA ’22

The Department of Theatre Arts presented “The Importance of Being Earnest” last weekend with spectacular success, drawing huge audiences. A classic by Oscar Wilde, the play is a biting and witty satire of Victorian society.

“GIRLS” is just the beginning for rising star Yung Baby Tate

“GIRLS” is just the beginning for rising star Yung Baby Tate

BY EMILY ROLES FOTSO ’21

Tate Farris, better known by her stage name Yung Baby Tate, released her debut studio album “GIRLS” this February, a 39-minute homage to womanhood and self-love. Since her beginnings as a producer in 2009, the Atlanta singer and rapper has combined pop, hip-hop and R&B elements to create a fun, unique and catchy sound. Long-awaited after the release of her first EP “ROYGBIV” in 2015, “GIRLS” does not disappoint, combining her youthful sound and rap and production skills to create a promising first work full of potential.

Subtle and moving: “Shoplifters” steals hearts

Subtle and moving: “Shoplifters” steals hearts

BY SABA FIAZUDDIN ’21

Director Hirokazu Kore-eda (“Like Father, Like Son,” “Nobody Knows” ) paints a poignant picture of a family that survives through theft in his latest film “Shoplifters.” Nobuyo (Sakura Ando), Osamu (Lily Franky), Aki (Mayu Matsuoka), Shota (Jyo Kairi) and Hatsue (Kirin Kiki) all sleep under the same roof in a shabby room, surrounded by other worn out apartment buildings in the sleepy suburbs of Tokyo.

Netflix’s “Sex Education” is a progressive coming of age story

Netflix’s “Sex Education” is a progressive coming of age story

BY CHLOE JENSEN ’20

Who among us does not enjoy a good binge-worthy Netflix show to soothe post-finals stress? I know I certainly do. After re-watching several episodes of “Gilmore Girls” and “Stranger Things” over winter break, I found myself craving a new, exciting, binge-worthy show. On Jan. 11, Netflix released its original series “Sex Education,” a funny, heartwarming and honest British show.

Glaspell’s Trifles at Rooke Theatre

Glaspell’s Trifles at Rooke Theatre

BY MIRANDA WHEELER ’19

“Well, women are used to worrying over trifles,” said Mr. Hale, played by Kylie Levy ’21 in last week’s production of Susan Glaspell’s 1916 one-act play “Trifles,” directed by Brianna Sloane. With set design by technical director Shawn Hill, lighting design by Lara Dubin, costume design by Elizabeth Lowe ’19 and dramaturgy from Heidi Holder, the one-act play opened Rooke Theatre’s Fall 2018 season.

“Big Mouth” season two charms with discomfort

“Big Mouth” season two charms with discomfort

BY GABBY RAYMOND ’20

Nick Kroll and John Mulaney, the stars of the Netflix series “Big Mouth,” took their audience on a cringeworthy 10-episode journey in their sophomore season. The show toggles between raunchy sing-along adult cartoon and the sexed class we all wish we had in high-school, though maybe not with P.E. teacher Coach Steve. There are moments you will not physically be able to look at the screen and others when you laugh so hard you cry — either way, the cesspool of middle school hormones is so relatable you’re going to have to buckle in for a binge watch.

Film review: “Mamma Mia 2! Here We Go Again”

Film review: “Mamma Mia 2! Here We Go Again”

BY MIRANDA WHEELER ’19

“Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again” serves as a playful reminder that art does not have to imitate life — it just needs to celebrate it. With the first film’s takeaway point being an ode to laughing one’s way through messy-wonderful accidents, the second takes a similar tone: loving company (and maybe a good party) as a remedy for grief. The film is a bubbly, feel-good tribute to the (spoiler alert) now-late Donna (Meryl Streep, “The Devil Wears Prada.”)

Schumer’s “I Feel Pretty” Struggles to Empower Women

Schumer’s “I Feel Pretty” Struggles to Empower Women

BY JAHIYA CLARK ’20

Society has conditioned women to believe that they must look “pretty” to be happy, but how valuable is  feeling “pretty?” In Amy Schumer’s new comedy “I Feel Pretty,” the running joke for most of the film is that the main character, Renee Bennett (played by Schumer, “Trainwreck”) thinks she is conventionally pretty. The joke is that it’s only in her head.

“Thoroughbreds” is a chilly, sophisticated thriller

 “Thoroughbreds” is a chilly, sophisticated thriller

BY EMMA MARTIN ’20

“Do you ever think about just killing him?” Amanda (Olivia Cooke, “Me, Earl and the Dying Girl”) asks her kind-of new friend Lily (Anya Taylor-Joy, “The Witch”) in a memorable scene from psychological thriller “Thoroughbreds,” the feature debut of writer-director Corey Finley. As Amanda casually uncorks a bottle of wine, the two teens first discuss the main subject of the movie — their plan to kill Lily’s stepfather Mark (Paul Sparks, “The Greatest Showman”).

“Game Over, Man!” is a small symptom of a massive problem within the entertainment industry

“Game Over, Man!” is a small symptom of a massive problem within the entertainment industry

BY ERIN CARBERRY ’19

It’s more than likely that not one person on the Mount Holyoke campus — save for myself — watched this recent Netflix release, helmed by the creative team and cast of “Workaholics,” a sitcom about college dropouts starring Adam DeVine (“Pitch Perfect”), Anders Holm (“The Mindy Project”) and Blake Anderson (“Dope”). Following in the footsteps of “Jackass” and “Harold & Kumar,” “Game Over, Man!” takes its niche genre — brainless, vulgar and hyper-masculine gross-out humor — to a startling new extreme.

Janelle Monae’s “Make Me Feel” emulates Prince

Janelle Monae’s “Make Me Feel” emulates Prince

BY AHLIA DUNN ’20

Singer Janelle Monae released the music video for her new single “Make Me Feel” last week to much fanfare. The first single off of her upcoming album, “Dirty Computer,” is a bonafide crop-growing, skin-clearing hit that appeals to fans, old and new. 

“Queer Eye” is back and fabulous

“Queer Eye” is back and fabulous

BY AMY YOELIN ’18

Carson, Kyan, Ted, Thom, and Jai: the original Fab Five. These names may mean nothing to you, but to me these men have been my unofficial gay fathers since “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” premiered in the early 2000s. Sadly, this show came to an end in 2007. Of course, in the age of reboots and renewals, Netflix picked it up, now titled “Queer Eye,” which follows the same premise of “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy,” except with a new Fab Five. 

“Black Panther” breaks barriers

“Black Panther” breaks barriers

BY JAHIYA CLARK ’20

Audiences across the nation had high expectations for the premiere of one the most anticipated Marvel films in years, “Black Panther.”While the film has been a box office success — according to Box Office Mojo the film has grossed over $462 million worldwide since its opening on Feb. 16 — “Black Panther” has also been a cultural success by --pushing the boundaries of how black people appear on screen.

Hollywood Classic tackles mental illness

Hollywood Classic tackles mental illness

BY ISAAC MICHAEL DONOVAN ’19

As both a person who struggles with mental illness and a film studies major, I have often found that depictions of mental illness in film fall short of portraying its actualities and the lives of those who experience it. However, the 1942 film “Now, Voyager,” starring Bette Davis (“The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex”), is one of the most accurate portrayals of mental illness I have seen to date. It is shocking to think that a classic Hollywood film could ever succeed in portraying mental illness  — a taboo subject even today — and do so in a progressive way. Davis excels in capturing the struggles of mental illness and the long journey towards self-determination and self-understanding.

End of the F***ing World

End of the F***ing World

“The End of the F***ing World” is part coming-of-age story, part “Pulp Fiction” tribute, with viewers following moody teenager Alyssa (Jessica Barden) and self-proclaimed psychopath James (Alex Lawther) as they try to outmaneuver the police — and their parents — after running away from home. Set to a retro soundtrack of American rock and doo-wop hits, the scrawny fugitives leave a path of destruction in their wake.

“Hidden Figures” holds an empowering message that’s still relevant in 2017

BY MARIANA JARAMILLO ’20

"Hidden Figures" is a 2016 movie directed by Theodore Melfi and produced by the wonderful Pharrell Williams. It's the hidden story of the group of women, Katherine G. Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who contributed their genius to NASA during the Space Race. They had to overcome the hurdles of both blatant racism and sexism that were prevalent in their time. These three women not only had to deal with the already seemingly impossible task of putting a human in space, but also had to dismantle the racism that prevented them from doing their best.