MHN Asks: How did the Women’s March impact you?

BY SHILOH FREDERICK '17

Photo courtesy of Mary Pura '17

Photo courtesy of Mary Pura '17

MARY PURA '17

Just being a part of history is something that will always stick with me. But what will definitely remain solidified in my memory is the tremendous amount of love and support that was expressed by so many people. It's been easy since the election to think that the whole country has lost its soul to hate. But I realized when I was there that Trump's America does not and will not exist. I saw what the people of this country really looked like at the march. What amazed me was that the organizers had expected 25,000 people and got well over 150,000. You can imagine that that many people jam-packed into a small location would create chaos. But no. Even though we huddled in masses for hours waiting to march on the streets, people weren't pushing or yelling at each other to move. People were laughing and dancing and loving together. So yeah, I think that will stay with me. There are so many people in this country who love rather than hate. As allies, I think many of us wanted to show others that they are not alone and that we will work together to maintain equality and democracy.


LIZ POST '19

I think what will stay with me is the fact that it was one of the largest protests in our history, and it was literally worldwide. Like, we were all united in this cause of wanting to go forward into the future and it just shows how the people differ so much from our current government.


ANQA KHAN '17

I appreciated the solidarity and the huge numbers, of course, but something that will stay with me is how unnervingly silent it was. That's why I had a problem with the march – there was quiet solidarity and not much else. I wanted more rousing speeches, more chants, more active participation and more people of color. I think it showed me that we still have a long ways to come in terms of who gets the platform or opportunity to participate, but I'm here to fight that fight.

Photo courtesy by Anqa Khan '17 

Photo courtesy by Anqa Khan '17 

Photo courtesy by Anqa Khan '17 

Photo courtesy by Anqa Khan '17 

Photo courtesy of Anqa Khan '17 

Photo courtesy of Anqa Khan '17 


ZOWIE BANTEAH-YUSELEW ’96

For me, I was conflicted at first to attend because I felt some organizational agendas were different from mine as an Indigenous woman, but the common thread that we all want action and justice, that we are stronger in numbers resonated for me. Thus, [we] all came together to move forward in a joint effort. I just think [for] Native folks this is nothing new so to speak as far as atrocities. However we are always overlooked or not even part of the discussion at times.


JASON ANDRAS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY

The impressions most likely to remain with me in the years to come are the feeling of empowerment fostered by the sheer magnitude of the crowd that was assembled for a common purpose, as well as the palpable feeling of enthusiasm and goodwill that seemed to pervade the entire march. I know these memories will continue to serve as a source of comfort, optimism and inspiration in trying times.


Photo courtesy of Emma Tulley '17

Photo courtesy of Emma Tulley '17

EMMA TULLEY ’17

What really resonated about the march for me was [the] powerful and immediate response that people had for Trump's inauguration. Seeing these thousands of people come together, supporting immigrant, women's, LGBTQ and minority rights made me realize that there are so many people who stand for what is right, and who are ready to oppose the administration tooth and nail for the next four years. It was inspiring, humbling and empowering.


LESLEY ZAPATA '16

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16 

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16 

It felt nice to be surrounded by like-minded people and it was extremely peaceful, and I was prepared for it to be violent. However, I definitely felt that the protest was not inclusive of all folks; womanhood, in my mind, does not include having a vagina. Something that stayed with me from the whole experience is that we have a long way to go to fully comprehend intersectional feminism and that was clearly missing from the protest.

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16 

Photo courtesy of Lesley Zapata '16 


KATE BALLANTINE, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Participating in the march in DC convinced me that we have what we need to share inspiration, to collaborate in action and to make positive change.  I hope that the march helped people around the world better understand the diversity of values, beliefs and approaches in the USA.

Photo courtesy of Kate Ballantine 

Photo courtesy of Kate Ballantine 

Photo courtesy of Kate Ballantine 

Photo courtesy of Kate Ballantine 

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