Carrie Clowers

“Lost in Space” joins expanding crew of impressive Netflix t.v. series

“Lost in Space” joins expanding crew of impressive Netflix t.v. series

BY ERIN CARBERRY ’19

Released on April 13, Netflix’s “Lost in Space” is a reimagining of the 1960s sci-fi classic television show of the same name. When the project was first announced, audiences had their reservations: some feared another gritty sci-fi reboot while others had flashbacks to the series’ last attempt at a reboot, the universally panned 1998 film. Overall, hesitant audiences have nothing to fear: the series has heart, wit and cleverness in equal measure.

A film worth fighting for: Disney struggles with remake of “Mulan”

A film worth fighting for: Disney struggles with remake of “Mulan”

BY EMMA RUBIN '20

“Dishonor on your whole family! Dishonor on you, dishonor on your cow!” The famous line comes from Disney’s 1998 animated film, “Mulan.” With Disney’s recent fetish for remaking films, it’s not surprising that the company decided to give “Mulan” the live-action treatment.

“The Titan” is its own worst enemy

“The Titan” is its own worst enemy

BY ERIN CARBERRY '19

The newest entry in an expanding catalogue of Netflix original films, “The Titan” examines issues of humanity, survival and hope. The futuristic thriller follows Abi Janssen (Taylor Schilling, “Orange is the New Black”) as she travels to a remote base with her family so that her husband, Rick (Sam Worthington, “Avatar”), can participate in a risky military experiment in genetic evolution and space exploration.

Demi Lovato wows with “Tell Me You Love Me” tour

Demi Lovato wows with “Tell Me You Love Me” tour

BY SARAH OLSEN ’18

Since her 2011 departure from Disney, Demi Lovato has been taking great strides to prove herself to be more than a childhood star. Last year she released her sixth album, “Tell Me You Love Me,” and, this February, she embarked on a world tour. The international portion starts in Brazil in May with the U.S. leg of the tour finishing in Newark, NJ this Monday. 

“Thoroughbreds” is a chilly, sophisticated thriller

 “Thoroughbreds” is a chilly, sophisticated thriller

BY EMMA MARTIN ’20

“Do you ever think about just killing him?” Amanda (Olivia Cooke, “Me, Earl and the Dying Girl”) asks her kind-of new friend Lily (Anya Taylor-Joy, “The Witch”) in a memorable scene from psychological thriller “Thoroughbreds,” the feature debut of writer-director Corey Finley. As Amanda casually uncorks a bottle of wine, the two teens first discuss the main subject of the movie — their plan to kill Lily’s stepfather Mark (Paul Sparks, “The Greatest Showman”).

Midnight screening of “The Room” unites fans

Midnight screening of “The Room” unites fans

BY EMMA MARTIN ’20

The screening room of the South Hadley Tower Theaters was buzzing last Saturday, as people gathered to see a special midnight screening of cult classic flop, “The Room,” written, directed by and starring Tommy Wiseau. As the title credits and oversweeping shots of San Francisco, it become apparent that no one in the theater was taking the movie seriously. The audience shouted and cracked jokes the entire evening. 

“Black Panther” breaks barriers

“Black Panther” breaks barriers

BY JAHIYA CLARK ’20

Audiences across the nation had high expectations for the premiere of one the most anticipated Marvel films in years, “Black Panther.”While the film has been a box office success — according to Box Office Mojo the film has grossed over $462 million worldwide since its opening on Feb. 16 — “Black Panther” has also been a cultural success by --pushing the boundaries of how black people appear on screen.

Latest “Cloverfield” fails its predecessors

Latest “Cloverfield” fails its predecessors

BY ERIN CARBERRY ’19

Netflix released the third installment in the science fiction  “Cloverfield” series following two short ads during the Super Bowl. In the 10 years since the first “Cloverfield” film and two years since its sequel, “10 Cloverfield Lane,” the seemingly rushed production of “The Cloverfield Paradox” is obvious. Set in the year 2028, when humanity has nearly depleted their energy supply and now rely on a particle accelerator called “the Shepard” for survival, “The Cloverfield Paradox” is a haphazard mash of other, more critically-acclaimed works. The film starts with the atmosphere of a lazily-crafted episode of “Black Mirror” but by the time the narrative shifts to the Cloverfield space station, it becomes a weaker version of “Alien” (complete with several recreations of its most iconic moments). Relying on jump-scares and on-screen violence, the film becomes entirely predictable and brings nothing new to the series or the genre.

Hollywood Classic tackles mental illness

Hollywood Classic tackles mental illness

BY ISAAC MICHAEL DONOVAN ’19

As both a person who struggles with mental illness and a film studies major, I have often found that depictions of mental illness in film fall short of portraying its actualities and the lives of those who experience it. However, the 1942 film “Now, Voyager,” starring Bette Davis (“The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex”), is one of the most accurate portrayals of mental illness I have seen to date. It is shocking to think that a classic Hollywood film could ever succeed in portraying mental illness  — a taboo subject even today — and do so in a progressive way. Davis excels in capturing the struggles of mental illness and the long journey towards self-determination and self-understanding.

The 2018 Grammys: Kesha and #MeToo Movement steal the show

The 2018 Grammys: Kesha and #MeToo Movement steal the show

BY SARAH OLSEN ’18

Music took center stage Sunday night as the Grammys celebrated artists, producers, songwriters and other members of the music industry. The 60th show featured nine of the 84 awards being handed out on-air between memorable performances from popular artists, such as Kendrick Lamar and Rihanna. 

     

  

    
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          
           
              Graphic by of Carrie Clowers ’18  
           
          

         
      
       
    

  


     BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21  In the days leading up to Halloween the campus was quiet as students, curled up in blankets and munched on Eggos, preparing for the second season of “Stranger Things.” The long-awaited season managed to be as fast-paced and mind-boggling as its predecessor, staying true to the show’s retro style and lovable characters while taking the drama to new heights. This resulted in a stellar season that was worth the wait. According to Variety, the first episode was viewed 15.8 million times within the first three days after its release, and there were 7.2 million posts about the season on Facebook and Twitter.  After Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown, “NCIS”)  disappears at the end of the first season, Will (Noah Schnapp, “The Peanuts Movie”), Mike (Finn Wolfhard, “It”), Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin, “Blue Bloods”) and Dustin (Gaten Matarazzo, “The Blacklist”) are together again, but nothing is the same. Mike is unable to move on from Eleven, calling her every day on his walkie talkie. Will has disturbing visions of the Upside Down that feel too real to be flashbacks. Lucas and Dustin find themselves pining over the same girl, Max (Sadie Sink, “American Odyssey”), a new student who skateboards and wows them with her arcade game prowess.   Meanwhile, unknown to all, Jim Hopper (David Harbour, “Brokeback Mountain”) is hiding Eleven in a cabin in the woods until things calm down. The dynamic between Hopper and Eleven is heartwarming, but also intense. While Hopper is desperate for a daughter and Eleven wants a father, Hopper’s overprotective instincts make Eleven feel trapped. The fights between the two characters are some of the most powerful scenes of the season with Hopper’s strong will going up against Eleven’s powers.   The drama of the season begins to unfold when Will becomes possessed by the antagonist of the season, the Mind Flayer. Once again, Hawkins is the target of an otherworldly attack, this one deadlier than the last.    In addition to solid performances from the well-loved cast, season two introduces new characters whose unique storylines helped the season distinguish itself from the first. Initially, Max was the epitome of the “she’s not like the other girls” trope, but as the season progressed she won me over. She’s distrusting and irritable, but recognizes her faults. As the show continues, Max becomes a necessary part of the team. While her character is a strong addition to the cast, her stepbrother Billy (Dacre Montgomery, “Power Rangers”) is one of the weakest. In “Beyond Stranger Things,” a set of interviews taking viewers behind-the-scenes, one of the show’s creators, Matt Duffer, explained that they “wanted this human antagonist … someone who was kind of irredeemable and a bit of a sociopath.” Unfortunately, Billy isn’t well developed and doesn’t contribute anything valuable to the plot. For example, his ill treatment and hatred of Lucas isn’t explained or acknowledged by other characters. After seeing Max with Lucas, Billy says “There are certain type of people in this world that you stay away from, and that kid, Max, that kid is one of them.” Billy had never interacted with Lucas before.   “I think he feels threatened,” Montgomery said of his character in an interview with the Huffington Post. “Max is that one constant he knows he needs to drop off and look after. . . It’s that animalistic side of like, ‘You’re threatening my sibling, my world. What are you doing? Who is this boy who’s trying to weave his way into my life through my sister?’” But Montgomery’s comment doesn’t explain Billy’s apparent hatred for his sister as he threatens to make Max skateboard home and refuses to look after her while their parents are gone. Hopefully the character will contribute more to the plot in future seasons.  According to Vulture, the Duffer Brothers have confirmed that there will be at least a third and a fourth season. This season ended neatly, so it’s difficult to see where the show will go from here. But the Duffer Brothers have proven their ability to expand the show while retaining its lovable qualities, so I think it’s safe to say we have something to look forward to.

BY OLIVIA MARBLE ’21

In the days leading up to Halloween the campus was quiet as students, curled up in blankets and munched on Eggos, preparing for the second season of “Stranger Things.” The long-awaited season managed to be as fast-paced and mind-boggling as its predecessor, staying true to the show’s retro style and lovable characters while taking the drama to new heights. This resulted in a stellar season that was worth the wait. According to Variety, the first episode was viewed 15.8 million times within the first three days after its release, and there were 7.2 million posts about the season on Facebook and Twitter.