Casey Roepke

Second annual Irish Fest celebrates Irish music and dance

Second annual Irish Fest celebrates Irish music and dance

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’21

Mount Holyoke’s Folk Music and Dance Society (FMDS) hosted their second annual Irish Fest, celebrating Irish music, dance and heritage, on the night of Saturday, March 23. An Irish flag hung vertically against the window of the Abbey-Buckland multipurpose space as traditional Irish instrumental music played and students and community members ate soda bread, sipped ginger beer and took their seats.

U.S. and Russia pull out of nuclear treaty

U.S. and Russia pull out of nuclear treaty

BY CASEY ROEPKE

In the two years since Donald Trump’s inauguration, his relationship with Russia has been questioned many times. From Robert Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election to a dossier claiming Trump once paid prostitutes to urinate on a bed in Moscow, Trump and Russia have become inextricable in the American consciousness. However, this close relationship was strained when the U.S. government, under the instruction of President Trump, dropped out of a nuclear arms control treaty on Feb. 1. The move was matched by Russia, where President Putin also suspended the treaty.

Tensions escalate at the U.S.-Mexico border

Tensions escalate at the U.S.-Mexico border

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’21

When asylum-seekers reach the U.S.-Mexico border, they have not yet reached the end of their long journey — they are only at the beginning. After traveling for days or weeks with limited resources, migrants still have to go through legal processes of requesting asylum. On Nov. 25, tensions around the border escalated to a visible breaking point at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry in San Diego, California.

Trump threatens to take away path to legal birthright citizenship

Trump threatens to take away path to legal birthright citizenship

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’21

President Donald Trump announced plans for an executive order to end birthright citizenship for Americans on Oct. 30. Political pundits and journalists were quick to announce that birthright citizenship is a constitutional guarantee that would take an act of Congress to amend. According to the Citizenship Clause of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, “all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.”

“Brazilian Trump” gains popularity after being stabbed at rally

“Brazilian Trump” gains popularity after being stabbed at rally

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’21

With upcoming presidential elections in October, Brazilian politics are boiling over. Jair Bolsonaro, the far-right front-runner, was stabbed at an election rally on Sept. 6. His fiercest opponent, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who is currently in jail for the infamous “Operation Cash War” corruption scandal, was barred from running as a presidential candidate by the Brazilian Superior Electoral Tribunal. His hand-picked successor, Fernando Haddad, also faces charges of corruption.

Hampshire Library Lawn turns into rainbow at Holi

Hampshire Library Lawn turns into rainbow at Holi

BY CASEY ROEPKE '21

On Saturday, April 21, students from  the Five Colleges gathered on the Hampshire College Library Lawn to celebrate Holi. Students threw colored powder at one another, soaking their clothing  with blue and green and filling the sky with bright plumes of pink and orange. The water gun fights and hoses sprayed festival-goers with plenty of water, ensuring the rainbow of powdered colors saturated the skin of the students themselves. 

Preventing “fake news” becomes relevant international policy

Preventing “fake news” becomes relevant international policy

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’21

The phenomenon of fake news, spotlighted recently in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, is not a new occurrence. Russia’s alleged interference during the campaign, via Facebook and other social media sites, was not the first time news was fabricated to alter the results of an election. In an episode of “Backstory,” a weekly history podcast, historian Mark Summers discussed the practices of “Gilded Age-era elections” and argued that past politicians consistently published lies about their opponents in newspapers in order to sway public opinion. However, before examining the effects of fake news in the U.S. and around the world, it is important to precisely define “fake news.”

Ballistic missile scare highlights vulerability of the Pacific region

Ballistic missile scare highlights vulerability of the Pacific region

BY CASEY ROEPKE ’18

After months of conflict and Twitter warfare between President Trump and Kim Jong-un, residents and visitors of Hawaii were greeted by what appeared to be the culmination of North Korea’s nuclear threats: an emergency warning message, reading “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.”